Irishry

I·rish·ry

 (ī′rĭsh-rē)
n. pl. I·rish·ries
1. The Irish people, especially those of Celtic ancestry.
2.
a. Irish character.
b. An Irish trait, custom, or locution; an Irishism.
References in classic literature ?
A big bark nosed cautiously out of the mist, and was received with shouts and cries of, "Come along, darlin'," from the Irishry.
Again Taaffe goes back to the early stages of the novel's composition and finds that originally the Pooka and the Good Fairy were "a Devil and an Angel, and their struggle over Orlick's soul firmly belong[ed] to a Christian universe of good and evil rather than to a strange corner of folk Irishry" (Taaffe 55).
Woodrow Wilson, being a Democratic politician, could proclaim his Irishry to a St Patrick's Day parade and in many intellectual and cultural matters was a strong anglophile.
I am of course not the first to address the postcolonial ethos in Yeats's work--David Lloyd in particular has a fine study on this subject (17)--but I want to pursue a slightly different argument from that put forward by other critics, and look in particular at the connections between 'Irishry' and the Gaelic, between ghosts and cultural memory.
Wilde was in such a dismayed mood in his dressing room that I hesitated to invite him out, but he seemed only too happy to avoid an early return to the Withnell House, where perhaps the Irishry of Omaha would be waiting to hurrah him, and we two strolled alone that cold, blustery night to my humble abode on 13th Street.
Although "some few septs of the Irishry" had been enfranchised by specific charters, "the Irish generally were held and reputed aliens, or rather enemies, to the Crown of England; insomuch as they were not only disabled to bring any actions, but they were so far out of the protection of the law as it was often adjudged no felony to kill a mere Irishman in the time of peace." (50) In short, the native Irish were not legal persons at common law; they could not hold suit in the king's courts in Ireland and their lives, goods, and estates did not fall under the protection of the king's law.
But then battle is joined, and the music switches to some sort of faux Celtic electro-rock, with processed beats and pipes swirling in lachrymose Irishry as the cleavers and slow-motion brickbats fly.
only the English colonies and some few septs of the Irishry, which were enfranchised by special charters, were admitted to the benefit and protection of the laws of England, and that the Irish generally were held and reputed aliens, or rather enemies, to the Crown of England; insomuch as they were not only disabled to bring any actions, but they were so far out of the protection of the law as it was often adjudged no felony to kill a mere Irishman in the time of peace.
When Foster pours scorn on the `stage Irishry' of the brothers McCourt for `trading on misery', or at the sentimentalised 150th anniversary commemorations of the Famine, he knows he is inciting Nationalist critics to accuse him of taking an `English' line.
It is The Quiet Man's perceived universality that constitutes a major problem for those who have been unable to see in the film anything more than (in Luke Gibbons' phrase) "a dream-world of stage Irishry and nostalgic sentiment." (41) The key to that universality lies, it seems to me, in the archetypal comic pattern I have attempted to describe, the pattern of saturnalian release that gives The Quiet Man so strong a resemblance to Shakespearean comedies such as A Midsummer Night's Dream or As You Like It.
She laughed at such flagrant Irishry; which is perhaps why, in the end, and in the knowledge that Dan's novel can never be read, lies eternally in the future, his ill-concealed ghost has made that impossible last his own impossible first.
If a country such as England has abused a smaller country such as Ireland for 700 years, amid depredation and slaughter, amid the contempt the British ruling class have had for the common, Irishry, and if the smaller, aggrieved country is now crying "foul" more effectively, the big country, naturally, would prefer that the little country be viewed as a nation of fools, however merry.